Mississippi Gulf Black Drum

Scientific Name: Pogonias cromis
Common Name(s): Drumfish, Banded Drum, Sea Drum, Tfambour Drum
Season: October–March
Similar Species: Grouper, Red Drum
Common Cooking Methods:

Bake, Blacken, Boil, Broil, Deep Fry, Grill, Poach, Raw, Sauté, Sear, Steam

Flavor:

Wild-caught Mississippi Gulf Black Drum is a versatile fish with a sweet and mild flavor similar to Mississippi Gulf Red Snapper. Its firm, moist meat easily breaks into large flakes, making it a great option for all kinds of dishes.

Facts:

The largest of all drumfish, Mississippi Gulf Black Drum can grow in excess of 90 lbs. These wild-caught saltwater fish have powerful jaws able to crush oyster shells. They’re often black and/or gray in color, while juvenile Mississippi Gulf Black Drum feature a distinctive stripe. 

Mississippi Gulf Flounder

Scientific Name:Paralichthys albigutta
Common Name(s):Sand Flounder, Gulf Flounder
Season:June–September
Similar Species:Pompano
Common Cooking Methods:

Bake, Blacken, Boil, Broil, Deep Fry, Grill, Poach, Sauté, Sear, Steam

Flavor:

Mississippi Gulf Flounder has a very fine, flaky texture and a mild, delicate flavor that goes well with lemon.

Facts:

Mississippi Gulf Flounder is one of the flatfish species. It has an oval, slightly elongated and very thin body. Mississippi Gulf Flounder is a left-eye flounder, which means the left side is the “up side” of the fish. It can grow up to 2 lbs. and 15 inches long. 

Mississippi Gulf Mullet

Scientific Name:Mugil cephalus
Common Name(s):Striped mullet, Jumping Mullet, Jumping Jack, Popeye Mullet, Lisa
Season:October–January
Similar Species:Mackerel, Swordfish, Tuna
Common Cooking Methods:

Bake, Blacken, Boil, Broil, Deep Fry, Grill, Microwave, Sauté, Sear, Smoke, Steam

Flavor:

Mississippi Gulf Mullet is a versatile fish. Its firm meat is very oily, which gives it a moist flavor, but also makes it harder to fry. Mississippi Gulf Mullet is delicious baked, broiled and smoked.

Fact:

Mississippi Gulf Mullet has a torpedo-shaped body with silvery-green scales on the back, and silver sides and belly. Mississippi Gulf Mullet is found in highly salty to fresh waters that are warm or temperate. It can often be seen in coastal waters, jumping to evade predators. 

Mississippi Gulf Red Drum

Scientific Name:Sciaenops ocellatus
Common Name(s):Channel Bass, Redfish, Bull Redfish, Spottail Bass, Puppy Drum
Seasons:January–March; October–December
Similar Species:Grouper, Red Snapper
Common Cooking Methods:

Bake, Blacken, Boil, Broil, Deep Fry, Grill, Poach, Sauté, Sear, Steam

Flavor:

Mississippi Gulf Red Drum is known for its moist, firm, flaky meat and a mild, sweet flavor. It is most closely compared to Mississippi Gulf Red Snapper.

Fact:

Mississippi Gulf Red Drum has a copper-bronze body with spots at the base of the tail. A popular sport fish, Mississippi Gulf Red Drum can grow to nearly 5 feet and 95 lbs. It lives in both saltwater and brackish, shallow water. 

Mississippi Gulf Red Snapper

Scientific Name:Lutjanus campechanus
Common Name(s):North American Red Snapper, American Reds, Snapper, Genuine Snapper
Peak Season:March–June
Similar Species:Grouper, Mahi-Mahi
Common Cooking Methods:

Bake, Blacken, Boil, Deep Fry, Grill, Poach, Raw, Sauté, Sear, Steam

Flavor:

Mississippi Gulf Red Snapper is light, extra-lean and moist, with a distinctly sweet and mild flavor that makes it a versatile choice for all kinds of recipes and cooking styles. Its meat is pinkish, but turns white when cooked.

Fact:

Mississippi Gulf Red Snapper is generally light red with a darker red back. Mississippi Gulf Red Snapper typically swim in depths of 30- to 200-feet, but can be found at waters up to 300 feet deep. It prefers rocky bottom ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs.

Mississippi Gulf Mangrove Snapper

Scientific Name:Lutjanus griseus
Common Name(s):Gray Snapper
Peak Season:March–June
Similar Species:Grouper, Mahi-Mahi
Common Cooking Methods:

Bake, Blacken, Boil, Deep Fry, Grill, Poach, Raw, Sauté, Sear, Steam

Flavor:

Mississippi Gulf Mangrove Snapper is loved for its lean, light and flaky meat, and mildly sweet flavor.

Fact:

The Mississippi Gulf Mangrove Snapper is one of the most common species of warm-region snapper. 

Mississippi Gulf Lane Snapper

Scientific Name:Lutjanus synagris
Common Name(s):Candy Stripper, Rainbow Snapper, Redtail Snapper, Spot Snapper
Peak Season:March–June
Similar Species:Grouper, Mahi-Mahi
Common Cooking Methods:

Bake, Blacken, Boil, Deep Fry, Grill, Poach, Raw, Sauté, Sear, Steam

Flavor:

Mississippi Gulf Lane Snapper is prized for its mild, delicate flavor and semi-firm white meat.

Fact:

Mississippi Gulf Lane Snapper is a rose-colored snapper with a faint greenish tint on its back and upper sides. It has irregular pink and yellow lines on its sides and a lone black spot. Unlike many other snapper species, Mississippi Gulf Lane Snapper is typically caught in shallower waters.  

yellowtail snapper

Mississippi Gulf Yellowtail Snapper

Scientific name:Ocyurus chrysurus
Common name(s):Cola or Yellowtail
Seasons:Year-round
Similar species:Grouper, Mahi-Mahi
Common Cooking Methods:

 Bake, Blacken, Boil, Deep Fry, Grill, Poach, Raw, Sauté, Sear, Steam

Flavor:

Mississippi Gulf Yellowtail Snapper is prized for its firm texture and light, flaky meat that is great for many cooking styles.

Fact:

Mississippi Gulf Yellowtail Snapper usually have a distinctive yellow stripe. It is typically caught in 30–120 feet of water around reefs and other structures, Mississippi Gulf Yellowtail Snapper must be at least 12″ long to be harvested in most areas. 

 

 

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Mississippi Spotted Sea Trout

Scientific name:Cynoscion nebulosus
Common name(s):Speckled Trout or Spotted Weakfish
Season:January–May
Similar species:Grouper, Red Snapper
Common Cooking Methods:

Bake, Blacken, Boil, Deep Fry, Grill, Poach, Raw, Sauté, Sear, Steam

Flavor:

Prized for its delicate meat, the Mississippi Gulf Spotted Sea Trout is one of the most sought-after saltwater fish species. Its mild, sweet flavor makes it a versatile option for a number of cooking preparations.

Fact:

Male Mississippi Gulf Spotted Sea Trout average about 19 inches in length while females average around 25 inches. Both usually weigh about 2–3 lbs. They have a dark gray or green back with silvery-white belly and distinct round spots on their back, fins and tail. They have no scales at all on the soft dorsal fin. They’re most often found in shallow bays and estuaries. 

 

Purchasing

Fresh: When purchasing finfish, only buy fish that is refrigerated or displayed on a thick bed of fresh ice that is not melting (preferably under some type of cover). Fish should smell fresh and mild.

Frozen: Do not buy frozen seafood if the package is open, torn, or crushed on the edges. Avoid packages with signs of frost or ice crystals.

Storage

Fresh: Fresh raw fish should be kept in the coldest part of your refrigerator. The refrigerator should be set between 34 – 40 degrees Fahrenheit. It’s best to use fresh fish within a day or two of purchase.

Frozen: Fresh raw fish can be frozen for about 3-4 months at 0 degrees Fahrenheit. To thaw, place in refrigerator for one day. Cooked: Cooked fish can be refrigerated for about 3-4 days and frozen for one month.

Preparation and Cooking

When keeping and preparing fresh or thawed seafood, it is important to prevent bacteria from raw seafood from spreading to ready-to-eat food. Wash hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water before and after handling any raw food. Once cooked, the flesh of finfish should be opaque and can separate easily with a fork.